Fighting for fish meals not fishmeal

Two true ocean champions made a big splash this afternoon at the Seafood Summit in Vancouver.  Dr. Jennifer Jacquet and Dr. Patricia Majluf made passionate pleas to stop the farming of carnivorous fish like salmon and start promoting direct wild fish consumption of so-called forage fish such as anchovies.   
 
Instead of tinkering with a flawed model – the dinosaur called salmon farming – why not cut to the chase (and cut out the middleman in the process) and feed wild fish such as anchovies directly to hungry and nutrition-poor families in Latin America?  

We need “fish meals not fish feed” argued Dr. Patricia Majluf from Peru.  Put simply – fish feed multinationals are stealing perfectly healthy food out of the mouths of Peruvians. 


 
Farming salmon is inherently unsustainable – full stop, period.  As Dr. Jennifer Jacquet from the University of British Columbia put it, “if you’re farming a predator you’ll always get less out than you put in”. 


 
Salmon farming is clearly a net loss in marine protein.  So why do we promote Ponzi schemes such as salmon farming? 
 
Step forward one of the middlemen at the Seafood Summit: fish feed giant Skretting (owned by Nutreco – who used to own Marine Harvest) who are one of the controversial funders of the Seafood Summit (along with ‘sustainable’ Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada).  Skretting claim in their advert in the glossy Seafood Summit brochure: “We are completely dedicated to the development of feeds that enable farmers to produce healthy and delicious fish and shrimp in a sustainable way”. 
 
Skretting also supply feed to the pig and cattle farming industry – so are used to dealing in porky pies and bull. 
 
So why have Seaweb and the Seafood Choices Alliances allowed themselves to be bought off hook line and stinker by such an unsustainable company?  At this rate next year’s Seafood Summit will be sponsored by AquaBounty and “sustainably” farmed GE salmon will be served at lunch.